X
Type in your search and press enter

EIG COVID-19 Update | October 19, 2020

October 19, 2020

With our mission to uncomplicate the complicated, we’ve always thought of our work in immigration as people-first. Our goal is for these updates to make sense of the changes happening across the world. Please share these updates with your colleagues who may find this information helpful, too.

International Updates

Canada, Mexico, and the United States | The land borders in North America will remain closed for non-essential travel until November 21.
Canada Case Update: 2,215 confirmed cases. Last updated: 2020/10/19 2:00 PM CEST
Mexico Case Update: 5,447 confirmed cases. Last updated: 2020/10/19 2:00 PM CEST
United States Case Update: 52,508 confirmed cases. Last updated: 2020/10/19 2:00 PM CEST

Israel | From October 23, travelers from the United Kingdom will have to self-isolate for 14 days upon their arrival. On Friday, the UK will officially be on Israel’s “red” country list.
Case Update: 1,613 confirmed cases. Last updated: 2020/10/19 2:00 PM CEST

Italy | To curb the coronavirus’s spread, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte gave mayors the power to shut public squares as early as 9 PM and restrict operating hours for restaurants, bars, cafes, and stores.
Case Update: 11,705 confirmed cases. Last updated: 2020/10/19 2:00 PM CEST

Malta | From Monday, face masks will be required in public, and night clubs, bars, and other entertainment venues will have to close at 11 PM.
Case Update: 130 confirmed cases. Last updated: 2020/10/19 2:00 PM CEST

Spain | As cases of the coronavirus increase across Spain, different regions are implementing local curfews, capacity limits, and regional boundary restrictions.
Case Update: 15,186 confirmed cases. Last updated: 2020/10/19 2:00 PM CEST

Wales | From Friday, there will be a two-week lockdown requiring everyone except for essential workers to remain at home.
UK Case Update: 16,981 confirmed cases. Last updated: 2020/10/19 2:00 PM CEST

United States Immigration Update | Following the two rule changes from DOL and DHS that will significantly reshape the H-1B specialty occupation visa program, a group of technology consulting firms has filed the first (of what is expected to be many) lawsuits.

In the lawsuit introduced on Friday, ITServe alleges that the Department of Labor, without notice, “dramatically altered” the method for calculating salaries for the H-1B visa program and other employment-based green cards.

It is expected that there will also be challenges to the DHS rule, which is to go into effect in December.